Author Archives: Andy Tait

Fueling System Compliance Violations

What happens when your fueling systems are out of compliance? Sometimes they leak. Often Notices of Violations (NOVs) will be given and fines may be assessed. Below are two examples recently shared by the Petroleum Equipment Institute (PEI), one from Texas – regulated by the TCEQ and one from California – regulated by the California State Resources Board (and individual CUPAs throughout the state). The PEI Convention at the NACS Show is coming up this October in Las Vegas, NV. TAIT will be there and will have a booth #7012 . Stop by and see us or contact us to learn more about keeping your fuel system in compliance. We have been working with fueling systems for over 50 years as a consultant and contractor and can answer questions and offer trusted advice on your particular situation.
TheTulsaLetter is the official newsletter of PEI and focuses on industry and association news. Regularly published by PEI since 1951, the TulsaLetter is relied upon by industry insiders for the latest information and updates on state and federal regulations, equipment standards, industry trends and personnel changes.
From PEI’s Newsletter:

IN THE COURTS
Nicholas Petroleum, Inc.
learned of a possible leak in 2006, when the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) asked the company to inspect its underground gasoline tanks (USTs) after reports of subsurface contamination. The company conducted the initial environmental investigation—but not the subsurface assessment TCEQ requested—and it ignored further inquiries by the agency until 2008, when a TCEQ inspector located a leak in an unleaded gasoline line. At the agency’s direction, Nicholas then hired a licensed contractor to investigate the release, and well water samples confirmed the contamination. TCEQ formally advised Nicholas on February 5, 2009, that it was a potential responsible party (PRP). Nicholas filed a claim with its insurance company, Mid-Continent Casualty. Co., Inc., on April 10, 2009, and the insurer denied it. Mid-Continent cited a provision in its policy stating that the insured had 30 days after receipt of the claim from TCEQ for filing a written claim with Mid-Continent, and that Nicholas had failed to do so.A Texas appeals court held that contracts must be enforced as written, and the notice requirement in the policy trumped the fact that Mid-Continent admittedly suffered no prejudice by the late filing.
The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
negotiated a $1.35 million agreement to resolve alleged UST violations at four facilities, the California State Water Resources Board said July 27. Specific allegations accused the transportation agency of failing to ensure monthly inspections and testing of various equipment; recordkeeping failures; failure to adequately maintain spill containment systems and equip USTs with overfill protection; and making false statements to authorities. The settlement requires the agency to pay $425,000 in penalties and $100,000 for reimbursement of enforcement costs. State officials agreed to suspend $850,000 in penalties and other payments if, over the next five years, the agency completes several enhanced compliance projects and remains in compliance with the laws and terms of the final consent judgment.

No Cost Online Fuel Spill Training Available to Marina Summer Hires

Spill prevention, planning and response training from Boat US offers videos, interactive exercises and interviews

Great news from Boat US for marina workers – free training teaching on how to respond to fuel and oil spills:

As the summer boating season is underway, marinas, boat yards and clubs are staffing up. These seasonal employees, sometimes high school, college students or part-timers are responsible for refueling hundreds of boats – but do they have the training to prevent a fuel spill? With a grant from National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the BoatUS Foundation now offers these seasonal employees a critical learning tool, “Spill Prevention and Response for Marina Staff,” at  BoatUS.org/spill-prevention.

The free online course, which covers spill prevention, planning and response, offers videos, interactive exercises and interviews with spill responders, marina owners and managers, and can be taken at anytime.
Image depicting No Cost Online Fuel Spill Training

Spill Prevention and Response for Marina Staff does not provide HAZWOPER certification but covers the simple ways any seasonal employee can help prevent spills and safely respond should a spill occur as well as the simple steps they can take to prevent a spill at your marina. While the course is designed for new marina staff, included throughout are management tips to provide additional information to more senior staff.

The course looks at practical topics, such as how to know when a boat fuel tank is full. Additional content includes a look at different types of oil and fuel products at marinas and how to handle each safely, legally and carefully; impacts on the environment; ways to identify spill prone activities and best practices to prevent a spill; safety concerns and precautions needed with handling oil and fuel; how spill prevention and response laws impact refueling facilities; how to prepare for spill events; and know what steps to take if you have a spill.

The BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water is a national leader promoting safe, clean and responsible boating. Funded primarily by the half-million members of BoatUS, it provides innovative educational outreach directly to boaters and anglers with the aim of reducing accidents and fatalities, increasing stewardship of America’s waterways and keeping boating safe for all.

Image promoting Everything to Start Your Own Local Life Jacket Loaner Site

BoatUS Foundation Has Everything to Start Your Own Local Life Jacket Loaner Site
Signage, Discounted Life Jackets, How-To Guide

Picture of the TAIT 50th Anniversary Logo

TAIT is a contractor that does design & construction & maintenance for fueling systems. If your marina needs updates to or a new fueling system, please contact us to learn more about our experience

The New UST Regulations have been Published

Picture of Melanie Nelson holding the new UST regs published in the Federal Register July 15 2015

The Implementation Timeline is now Ticking for the new Underground Storage Tank Regulations

The EPA’s Revisions to 40 CFR Parts 280 and 281 have been published in the Federal Register today – July 15, 2015

The Final Rule – Revising Underground Storage Tank Regulations—Revisions to Existing Requirements and New Requirements for Secondary Containment and Operator Training – was Published today in the Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 135.

This rule is effective October 13, 2015.

Wondering how this may affect you, your company or your regulating authority? That depends on where in the country you are located. Owners and operators in states that already has state program approval (SPA), will keep operating under their current regulations for now – those states have three years to reapply in order to retain their SPA status. Owners and operators in the 16 non-SPA states and territories must meet the federal requirements – the implementation schedule in the 2015 UST regulations (and of course follow their state requirements). Here is a breakdown of the implementation times:

Required Immediately

  • Elimination of ball floats/flow restrictors in vent lines as standalone overfill prevention
  • Close tanks using internal lining as the sole method of corrosion protection when the lining fails
  • 30 day Notification of UST Ownership Change
  • Proof of compatibility of UST and product when storing >10% ethanol or >20% biodiesel
  • Testing 30 Days after Repairs to spill or overfill equipment and secondary containment areas

Required in 180 days

  • Secondary Containment

Required in three years

  • Operator Training
  • 30-Day Walkthrough Inspections
  • Annual Inspections of Containment Sumps and Hand Held Release Detection equipment
  • Spill Prevention Testing
  • Overfill Prevention Equipment Inspection
  • Containment Sumps used for Piping interstitial monitoring
  • Emergency Generators require release detection
  • State programs have to be re-approved

Here is the Summary, and you can find additional information in the blog links below.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is making certain revisions to the 1988 underground storage tank (UST) regulation and to the 1988 state program approval (SPA) regulation. These changes establish Federal requirements that are similar to key portions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct); they also update the 1988 UST and SPA regulations. Changes to the regulations include: Adding secondary containment requirements for new and replaced tanks and piping; adding operator training requirements; adding periodic operation and  maintenance requirements for UST systems; addressing UST systems deferred in the 1988 UST regulation; adding new release prevention and detection technologies; updating codes of practice; making editorial corrections and technical amendments; and updating state program approval requirements to incorporate these new changes. EPA thinks these changes will protect human health and the environment by reducing the number of releases to the environment and quickly detecting releases, if they occur.

Contact us with questions you have about the new regulations and how they’ll affect you/your company. We have over 50 years experience with fueling systems – USTs, ASTs and piping and have a good understanding of how the regulations will be implemented and what that means to the UST owner/operators.

Previous TAIT Blogs about the New Regs

Enrollment for the Statewide Industrial General Storm Water Permit Extended 8/14/15

There’s still time for TAIT to assist with your CA Industrial General Storm Water Permit

Enrollment for the Statewide Industrial General Storm Water Permit (2014-0057-DWQ) has been Extended 6 weeks to close of business on Friday, August 14, 2015

Image of a Storm Drain
After close of business today, the State Water Resources Control Board announced the extension, saying

As you likely have observed, the State Water Resources Control Boards’ (State Water Board) SMARTS Storm Water Program database is limiting new enrollments or annual submittals from existing enrollees as required by the Statewide Industrial General Storm Water Permit (IGP). State Water Board staff have identified a technical issue that is affecting bandwidth of the system and restricting access to the database. Due to these challenges, the July 1, 2015 deadline for enrollment under IGP Permit 2014-0057-DWQ, adopted by the State Water Board on April 1, 2014, and the deadline for submittals under the now expired IGP Permit 97-03-DWQ have both been extended to close of business on Friday, August 14, 2015. This database access issue does not impact saved work items in SMARTS. If you have any questions or need customer assistance, our staff will be available to assist you during our normal business hours – Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

There are changes and you need to be prepared. For an overview, read our recent blog about CA’s New Industrial Storm Water Discharge Permit. IGP requires electronic applications and reporting. If you missed the 2015 Workshops for the New Industrial General Permit, we’ll be happy to discuss changes and the process with you, as well as perform the permitting for you. There are also resources available online such as the Summary of Significant Changes for the New Industrial General Permit. We look forward to talking with you.

Overview of the EPA’s 2015 Changes to UST Regulations

Here are Some of the Significant Changes to 40 CFR part 280

The EPA’s 2015 Final Regulations for USTs changes certain portions of the 1988 underground storage tank technical regulation in 40 CFR part 280. The changes establish federal requirements that are similar to key portions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. In addition, EPA added new operation and maintenance requirements and addressed UST systems deferred in the 1988 UST regulation. Some major changes include:

  • Requiring secondary containment for new and replaced tanks and piping
  • Requiring operator training
  • Requiring periodic operation and maintenance requirements, mandatory equipment inspections/testing that is focused on the parts most likely to leak: 30-day walk through (look at spill prevention equipment and release detection equipment), annual testing/inspections (containment sumps and hand held release detection, release detection equipment testing – including LLDs testing) and triennial testing/inspections (spill prevention equipment testing, overfill prevention equipment inspections, containment sumps used for piping interstitial monitoring)
  • Requiring proof of UST system compatibility with certain fuels and biofuels
  • Including emergency power generator tanks (now requires owners and operators to perform release detection)
  • Making technical corrections to disregard older technologies and recognize new ones like clad and jacketed tanks, non-corrodible piping, continuous in-tank leak detection and statistical inventory reconciliation (SIR)
  • No more ball floats/flow restrictors in vent lines as a standalone method of overfill prevention
  • Close tanks using internal lining as the sole method of corrosion protection when the lining fails
  • Requiring Testing 30 Days after Repairs to spill or overfill equipment and secondary containment areas
  • State programs need to be re-approved

Contact us with questions you have about the new regulations and how they’ll affect you/your company.

How much time do you have to implement these changes?

There’s still time while we wait for them to be published in the Federal Register. Once they are, they will be required to be implemented at different time increments:

  • some will be required quickly – Secondary Containment (180 days), Elimination of ball floats/flow restrictors in vent lines as standalone overfill prevention (immediately) Close tanks using internal lining as the sole method of corrosion protection when the lining fails (immediately), 30 day Notification of UST Ownership Change (immediately) proof of compatibility of UST and product when storing >10% ethanol or >20% biodiesel (immediately), Testing 30 Days after Repairs to spill or overfill equipment and secondary containment areas (immediately)
  • some in a year, and
  • some in three years – Operator Training, 30-Day Walkthrough Inspections, Annual Inspections of Containment Sumps and Hand Held Release Detection equipment, Spill Prevention Testing, Overfill Prevention Equipment Inspection, Containment Sumps used for Piping interstitial monitoring, Emergency Generators require release detection, state programs have to be re-approved

More detailed blog entries will address each of these issues, and you can ask us any questions in the meantime. We have over 50 years experience with fueling systems – USTs, ASTs and piping and have a good understanding of how the regulations will be implemented and what that means to the UST owner/operators. Here are some related previous blogs:

Comparing EPA’s 2015 Revised UST Regulations Documents

Where do you start?

Want to know where to start when reviewing the 2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations Documents? I’ve been pouring through the documents shared on EPA’s website created just for the revisions of the UST regulations and here are some quick descriptions that I hope you’ll find helpful.

Comparison Chart of the 2015 Revised UST Regulations versus the 1988 UST Regulations This is a 10 page PDF Spreadsheet showing the highlights of the changes

Prepublication version of the final UST regulations This is the full 468 page document that explains the rationale behind the changes that were made to the regulations and includes the new regulations. The first half is an explanation that helps the reader to understand what the EPA considered, such as suggestions from commenters, during the discussion and decision making and the rationale for the decisions that were made. Here are the page numbers to go with the Table of Contents. That should help you navigate this big document 🙂

Red Line Strikeout of 40 CFR part 280 and 40 CFR part 281 This is 141 pages but is very helpful if you are used to looking up information in the regs already. This shows the differences between the regulations we are currently using/looking at, and the changes that have been made to the regulations.

MUSTs for USTs If you are new to owning or operating underground storage tanks, start here. TAIT recommends all Owners and Operators download and read the updated MUSTs for USTs. It’s an instruction manual that provides a nice straightforward explanation of requirements when owning and working with underground storage tanks. It’s 40 pages.

Regulatory impact analysis 167 pages, Potential costs, benefits and other impacts of the updated regs. They’re referred to in the Prepublication Version of the Regs as well. This may be good for giving an explanation of what we might expect to see overall, like the number of facilities affected.

Response to comments document 181 pages, if you commented on the regs and want to see the responses given, this is where you would look. Comments are also referred to in the Prepublication version of the final regs.

I hope this serves as a nice reference for you, and this should make finding what you are looking for even easier 🙂 For a more details, see the announcement blog 2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations.
Picture of the TAIT 50th Anniversary Logo

Here are more related blogs:

Here are Page Numbers for the 468p Prepublication Version of the Final UST Regulations

Are you reviewing the 2015 Revised UST Regs to find out what applies to you?

I have been, and there is a lot to read! I found it extremely helpful to add page numbers to my table of contents for quick reference when going through the 468 page document, called the Prepublication version of the final UST regulations. I’m sharing those numbers with you, too! This should make finding what you are looking for even easier 🙂 Although the formatting doesn’t copy properly, it’s in the same order and I’ll put the page numbers (in parenthesis) and bold them so they stand out for you.
Picture of Melanie's 2015 UST Regulations Binder

We like to help you understand the UST regulations. TAIT stays abreast of current and upcoming regulations and performs tank work around the country. From fueling system design and installation, ongoing compliance inspections and testing, repairs and upgrades, to tank replacements, removals and closures, TAIT can assist you with your tank projects. In the business over 50 years, we are experts and can your nationwide tank compliance program or perform one inspection for you. Plan for the future – these regs are coming (we do have time, from immediate, to one year, up to three years for some changes) Reach out to me and tell me what you’re considering, I’ll be happy to discuss your options with you. Melanie Nelson mnelson@tait.com 214-531-9377

Prepublication Version of the Final UST Regulations Table of Contents

I. General Information (6)

Does this Action Apply to Me? (6)

II. Authority (6)

III. Background (7)

A. Changes to the UST Regulations (7)

B. History of the UST Laws and Regulations (12)

C. Potential Impact of this Regulation (13)

D. EPA’s Process in Deciding Which Changes to Incorporate in the Regulations (15)

E. Implementation Timeframe (17)

IV. Revisions to the Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tank Systems (19)

A. Establishing Federal Requirements for Operator Training and Secondary Containment (20)

1. Operator Training (20)

2. Secondary Containment (30)

B. Additional Requirements for Operation and Maintenance (39)

1. Walkthrough Inspections (40)

2. Spill Prevention Equipment Tests (46)

3. Overfill Prevention Equipment Inspections (51)

4. Secondary Containment Tests (55)

5. Release Detection Equipment Tests (62)

C. Addressing Deferrals (68)

1. UST Systems Storing Fuel Solely for Use by Emergency Power Generators – Require Release Detection (69)

2. Airport Hydrant Fuel Distribution Systems and UST Systems with Field-Constructed Tanks (74)

3. Wastewater Treatment Tank Systems that Are Not Part of a Wastewater Treatment Facility Regulated Under Sections 402 or 307(b) of the Clean Water Act (125)

4. USTs Containing Radioactive Material and Emergency Generator UST Systems at Nuclear Power Generation Facilities Regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ( )

D. Other Changes (133)

1. Changes to Overfill Prevention Equipment Requirements (134)

2. Internal Linings that Fail the Periodic Lining Inspection and Cannot Be Repaired (136)

3. Notification (138)

4. Compatibility (142)

5. Improving Repairs (153)

6. Vapor Monitoring and Groundwater Monitoring (157)

7. Interstitial Monitoring Results, Including Interstitial Alarms, Under Subpart E (163)

E. General Updates (168)

1. Incorporate Newer Technologies (168)

2. Updates to Codes of Practice Listed in the UST Regulation (178)

3. Updates to Remove Old Upgrade and Implementation Deadlines (182)

4. Editorial Corrections and Technical Amendments (184)

F. Alternative Options EPA Considered (188)

V. Updates to State Program Approval Requirements (194)

VI. Overview of Estimated Costs and Benefits (211)

VII. Statutory and Executive Orders (212)

A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Overview and Executive Order 13563: Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review (212)

B. Paperwork Reduction Act (212)

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act (214)

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (215)

E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism (217)

F. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (217)

G. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (219)

H. Executive Order 13211: Actions Concerning Regulations that Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use (221)

I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (223)

J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations (223)

K. Congressional Review Act (225)

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

After the EPA’s explanation of considerations and decisions about the changes (p. 5-225), the regulations follow. As I note those changes, I will add them here.

 

CA’s New Industrial Storm Water Discharge Permit is effective July 1, 2015

Are you aware of the changes to California’s Industrial Stormwater Discharge Permit? Are you prepared to submit electronically?

What are stormwater permits and why do I need to know?

The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Stormwater runoff is generated when precipitation from rain and snowmelt events flows over land or impervious surfaces and does not percolate into the ground. As the runoff flows over the land or impervious surfaces (paved streets, parking lots, and building rooftops), it accumulates debris, chemicals, sediment or other pollutants that could adversely affect water quality if the runoff is discharged untreated. Most stormwater discharges are considered point sources and require coverage under an NPDES permit. Click to learn more about the Stormwater program. Most states are authorized to implement the Stormwater NPDES permitting program. EPA remains the permitting authority in a few states, territories, and on most land in Indian Country.

CalEPA stormwater

Are you in California? Ready for the New Industrial Stormwater Permit?

In California, the CalEPA’s State Water Resources Board is the authority. The new Industrial General Permit (IGP) was adopted April 1, 2014 and is effective July 1, 2015. The IGP requires electronic applications and reporting. If you missed the
2015 Workshops for the New Industrial General Permit, we’ll be happy to discuss changes and the process with you, as well as perform the permitting for you. There are also resources available online such as the Summary of Significant Changes for the New Industrial General Permit.

NATIONALPOLLUTANTDISCHARGEELIMINATION SYSTEM (NPDES) GENERALPERMIT FOR STORMWATER DISCHARGES ASSOCIATED WITH INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITIES ORDER NPDES NO. CAS000001 ORDER 2014-0057-DWQ

 TAIT’s professional environmental consultants can provide one or all of the following services associated with this plan: 

  1. Preparation of the Notice of Intent (NOI) and Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) and Site Map for the new General Permit. Assist clients with the electronic upload of the required information into the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Storm Water Multiple Application and Report Tracking System (SMARTS).
  2. Perform and document monthly inspections of the facilities to visually observe the best management practices (BMPs) for each drainage area for:
    • Unauthorized non-storm water discharges (NSWDs)
    • Authorized NSWDs
    • Outdoor Industrial activities, BMPs, potential pollutant sources
  3. Perform Qualifying Storm Event (QSE sampling):
    • 2 sampling events within first half of reporting year
    • 2 sampling events within second half of reporting year
    • Upload of sampling data into SMARTS database
  4. Prepare annual reports of facility activities, inspections, and sampling for the calendar year ending on July 1 of each year.  Upload of reports into the SMARTS database.
  5. If your facility qualifies for a No Exposure Certification (NEC), TAIT can assist with the preparation and uploading of the initial Permit Registration Documents (PRDs) and annual recertification documents via SMARTS.

Reach out to us and ask any questions you have. The deadline is coming up quickly, and we are here to help 🙂

New UST Regs for Protection from Groundwater Contamination

EPA’s updated underground storage tanks (UST) regulations are final and will be published soon in the Federal Register

The U.S. EPA has strengthened the Underground Storage Tank (UST) requirements to protect us from groundwater contamination with better prevention and detection of leaks from UST systems. The UST program changes, revisions to the 1988 federal underground storage tank (UST) regulations, strengthen UST prevention and detection practices, increase emphasis on properly operating and maintaining UST equipment, and ensure parity in implementing the national UST program. This is the first major revision to the federal UST regulations since 1988.

Check out the Comparison Chart overview of the 468 page document– it points out major changes to the 1988 UST regulations with the new 2015 UST regulations. You can see the actual differences in a redline strikeout version showing the final 2015 regulations imbedded into the existing regulations. I’ve found both of these documents very helpful. The 10-page chart is a great quick review and the strikeout is a good resource.

EPA created a specific website for the Revised UST Regulations so you can access links to a pre-publication version of the signed regulations, regulatory impact analysis, and response to comments document as well as the comparison and additional resources. Once published, a link to the Federal Register version of the regulations will also be listed there.

I really liked that Carolyn Hoskinson, the head of EPA’s UST program shared

At all times we based our decisions on these strong values:

  • balance important environmental protection with the reasonableness of the cost and complexity to our regulated community
  • focus on the highest priority areas that appear to continue to lead to ongoing releases from UST systems
  • allow flexibility whenever possible
  • rely on industry standards whenever possible
  • consider the implementation of these requirements and strive to make the requirements as straightforward as possible by things like aligning due dates and writing in plain, easy-to-understand language

While these changes may be difficult and expensive for people/companies, I understand that the underlying purpose is to protect us from groundwater contamination and appreciate the values Carolyn pointed out they operated under as they considered their revisions. The EPA granted a 3 year grace period for many of the significant changes. If you have any questions about your UST compliance, please ask. We’re here to help.

Melanie

View from one of TAIT's projects in Alaska

View from one of TAIT’s projects in Alaska

UST Corrective Action Training

Did you know the EPA offers UST Corrective Action Training?

Multiple webinars are available for immediate free online learning

What are you interested in learning more about?

Innovate treatment and site characterization technologies for waste remediation

EPA has a website dedicated to Contaminated Site Clean-Up Information called CLU-IN. It’s full of information about Technologies, Contaminants, Issues, Strategies & Initiatives, Vendors & Developers, and it even lists Training & Events and Additional Resources.

  • Their next webinar is July 28th – SRI Webinar Series: Green Infrastructure: Reusing Contaminated Sites and Promoting Sustainable Communities. Click here to register.
  • You can start learning right now through their Archived Internet Seminars & Podcasts

Innovative analytical techniques, sampling strategies, and remediation technologies that are relevant to contaminated UST sites

The EPA developed a two-part, six hour site assessment and remediation training webinar you can access online called Best Management and Technical Practices for Site Assessment and Remediation

Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

You can access the archived Training Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management online. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council sponsored this training based on empirical data and research to support PVI decision making under different regulatory frameworks. Here is the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Web-Based Document. It’s very extensive and a great resource.

  • There is no cost to participate in the ITRC on-line training whether it is a “live” training session or an archive of a previously offered training session, so I recommend if you’re interested that you register to receive more information. You can watch for Upcoming Live Web Events online.
  • Starting in late 2015, ITRC will offer a 2-day PVI focused classroom training at locations across the US. Email to indicate your interest in learning more in-depth information about the PVI pathway and practice applying the ITRC PVI guidance document

Remediation Strategy Decision-Making

The EPA developed this five-part webinar to provide experience using publicly-available simulation and data analysis tools that can be used to support remediation decisions and strategy development for sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents, petroleum hydrocarbons, or other constituents

Are you a remediation and/or site assessment professional? You can track new publications and events of interest by subscribing online to the EPA’s TechDirect and other newsletters.