Category Archives: Idaho

UST Secondary Containment and Interstitial Monitoring Requirements

Are you responsible for ensuring site or corporate environmental compliance or for implementing a site environmental management system that includes fueling systems? Whether you’re an environmental manager, a plant engineer, plant/general manager, facility manager, site manager or other role, if you’re involved with underground fuel storage tanks, the new rules regarding secondary containment should be of interest.

Federal UST Secondary Containment and Interstitial Monitoring Requirements

The 1988 requirement and criteria required secondary containment and interstitial monitoring for hazardous substance tanks only (280.42). The EPA is implementing secondary containment with interstitial monitoring and under-dispenser containment (UDC) as additional measures to protect groundwater. States that have already implemented secondary containment regulations that meet or exceed the federal regulations will not have to change their requirements. There are significant changes to the federal requirements and implementation which are summarized below. The implementation timeframe for secondary containment is 180 days. States with approved programs still have three years to reapply, and depending on which state you are in, you may still be governed by the state program rather than the EPA regulations.

Owners and operators are required to install tank and piping secondary containment that will contain regulated substances leaked from the primary containment until they are detected and removed and that will prevent the release of regulated substances to the environment at any time during the operational life of the UST system, and must be  monitored for leaks at least once every 30 days using interstitial monitoring.

NEW INSTALLS and REPLACING Tanks and Piping

Owners and operators are now required to install secondary containment and interstitial monitoring for ALL (including petroleum) new and replaced tanks and piping. There are still some exceptions like safe suction piping and piping associated with field-constructed tanks over 50k gallons, and airport hydrant systems.

REPAIRING Piping

Owners and operators must replace the entire piping run when 50% or more of the piping (excluding connectors) is removed and other piping is installed.

NEW DISPENSERS

All new dispensers need to have under-dispenser containment.

Interstitial Monitoring

Interstitial Monitoring of new and replaced secondarily contained tanks and piping must occur at least once every 30 days as a release detection requirement.

The EPA reviewed data from release sites and the higher number of releases from single walled tanks and piping when compared to secondarily contained systems was considered in the decision for new requirements to prevent regulated substances from reaching the environment and ensure a consistent level of environmental protection for regulated USTs across the USA.

 

The New UST Regulations have been Published

Picture of Melanie Nelson holding the new UST regs published in the Federal Register July 15 2015

The Implementation Timeline is now Ticking for the new Underground Storage Tank Regulations

The EPA’s Revisions to 40 CFR Parts 280 and 281 have been published in the Federal Register today – July 15, 2015

The Final Rule – Revising Underground Storage Tank Regulations—Revisions to Existing Requirements and New Requirements for Secondary Containment and Operator Training – was Published today in the Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 135.

This rule is effective October 13, 2015.

Wondering how this may affect you, your company or your regulating authority? That depends on where in the country you are located. Owners and operators in states that already has state program approval (SPA), will keep operating under their current regulations for now – those states have three years to reapply in order to retain their SPA status. Owners and operators in the 16 non-SPA states and territories must meet the federal requirements – the implementation schedule in the 2015 UST regulations (and of course follow their state requirements). Here is a breakdown of the implementation times:

Required Immediately

  • Elimination of ball floats/flow restrictors in vent lines as standalone overfill prevention
  • Close tanks using internal lining as the sole method of corrosion protection when the lining fails
  • 30 day Notification of UST Ownership Change
  • Proof of compatibility of UST and product when storing >10% ethanol or >20% biodiesel
  • Testing 30 Days after Repairs to spill or overfill equipment and secondary containment areas

Required in 180 days

  • Secondary Containment

Required in three years

  • Operator Training
  • 30-Day Walkthrough Inspections
  • Annual Inspections of Containment Sumps and Hand Held Release Detection equipment
  • Spill Prevention Testing
  • Overfill Prevention Equipment Inspection
  • Containment Sumps used for Piping interstitial monitoring
  • Emergency Generators require release detection
  • State programs have to be re-approved

Here is the Summary, and you can find additional information in the blog links below.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is making certain revisions to the 1988 underground storage tank (UST) regulation and to the 1988 state program approval (SPA) regulation. These changes establish Federal requirements that are similar to key portions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct); they also update the 1988 UST and SPA regulations. Changes to the regulations include: Adding secondary containment requirements for new and replaced tanks and piping; adding operator training requirements; adding periodic operation and  maintenance requirements for UST systems; addressing UST systems deferred in the 1988 UST regulation; adding new release prevention and detection technologies; updating codes of practice; making editorial corrections and technical amendments; and updating state program approval requirements to incorporate these new changes. EPA thinks these changes will protect human health and the environment by reducing the number of releases to the environment and quickly detecting releases, if they occur.

Contact us with questions you have about the new regulations and how they’ll affect you/your company. We have over 50 years experience with fueling systems – USTs, ASTs and piping and have a good understanding of how the regulations will be implemented and what that means to the UST owner/operators.

Previous TAIT Blogs about the New Regs

Overview of the EPA’s 2015 Changes to UST Regulations

Here are Some of the Significant Changes to 40 CFR part 280

The EPA’s 2015 Final Regulations for USTs changes certain portions of the 1988 underground storage tank technical regulation in 40 CFR part 280. The changes establish federal requirements that are similar to key portions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. In addition, EPA added new operation and maintenance requirements and addressed UST systems deferred in the 1988 UST regulation. Some major changes include:

  • Requiring secondary containment for new and replaced tanks and piping
  • Requiring operator training
  • Requiring periodic operation and maintenance requirements, mandatory equipment inspections/testing that is focused on the parts most likely to leak: 30-day walk through (look at spill prevention equipment and release detection equipment), annual testing/inspections (containment sumps and hand held release detection, release detection equipment testing – including LLDs testing) and triennial testing/inspections (spill prevention equipment testing, overfill prevention equipment inspections, containment sumps used for piping interstitial monitoring)
  • Requiring proof of UST system compatibility with certain fuels and biofuels
  • Including emergency power generator tanks (now requires owners and operators to perform release detection)
  • Making technical corrections to disregard older technologies and recognize new ones like clad and jacketed tanks, non-corrodible piping, continuous in-tank leak detection and statistical inventory reconciliation (SIR)
  • No more ball floats/flow restrictors in vent lines as a standalone method of overfill prevention
  • Close tanks using internal lining as the sole method of corrosion protection when the lining fails
  • Requiring Testing 30 Days after Repairs to spill or overfill equipment and secondary containment areas
  • State programs need to be re-approved

Contact us with questions you have about the new regulations and how they’ll affect you/your company.

How much time do you have to implement these changes?

There’s still time while we wait for them to be published in the Federal Register. Once they are, they will be required to be implemented at different time increments:

  • some will be required quickly – Secondary Containment (180 days), Elimination of ball floats/flow restrictors in vent lines as standalone overfill prevention (immediately) Close tanks using internal lining as the sole method of corrosion protection when the lining fails (immediately), 30 day Notification of UST Ownership Change (immediately) proof of compatibility of UST and product when storing >10% ethanol or >20% biodiesel (immediately), Testing 30 Days after Repairs to spill or overfill equipment and secondary containment areas (immediately)
  • some in a year, and
  • some in three years – Operator Training, 30-Day Walkthrough Inspections, Annual Inspections of Containment Sumps and Hand Held Release Detection equipment, Spill Prevention Testing, Overfill Prevention Equipment Inspection, Containment Sumps used for Piping interstitial monitoring, Emergency Generators require release detection, state programs have to be re-approved

More detailed blog entries will address each of these issues, and you can ask us any questions in the meantime. We have over 50 years experience with fueling systems – USTs, ASTs and piping and have a good understanding of how the regulations will be implemented and what that means to the UST owner/operators. Here are some related previous blogs:

Comparing EPA’s 2015 Revised UST Regulations Documents

Where do you start?

Want to know where to start when reviewing the 2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations Documents? I’ve been pouring through the documents shared on EPA’s website created just for the revisions of the UST regulations and here are some quick descriptions that I hope you’ll find helpful.

Comparison Chart of the 2015 Revised UST Regulations versus the 1988 UST Regulations This is a 10 page PDF Spreadsheet showing the highlights of the changes

Prepublication version of the final UST regulations This is the full 468 page document that explains the rationale behind the changes that were made to the regulations and includes the new regulations. The first half is an explanation that helps the reader to understand what the EPA considered, such as suggestions from commenters, during the discussion and decision making and the rationale for the decisions that were made. Here are the page numbers to go with the Table of Contents. That should help you navigate this big document 🙂

Red Line Strikeout of 40 CFR part 280 and 40 CFR part 281 This is 141 pages but is very helpful if you are used to looking up information in the regs already. This shows the differences between the regulations we are currently using/looking at, and the changes that have been made to the regulations.

MUSTs for USTs If you are new to owning or operating underground storage tanks, start here. TAIT recommends all Owners and Operators download and read the updated MUSTs for USTs. It’s an instruction manual that provides a nice straightforward explanation of requirements when owning and working with underground storage tanks. It’s 40 pages.

Regulatory impact analysis 167 pages, Potential costs, benefits and other impacts of the updated regs. They’re referred to in the Prepublication Version of the Regs as well. This may be good for giving an explanation of what we might expect to see overall, like the number of facilities affected.

Response to comments document 181 pages, if you commented on the regs and want to see the responses given, this is where you would look. Comments are also referred to in the Prepublication version of the final regs.

I hope this serves as a nice reference for you, and this should make finding what you are looking for even easier 🙂 For a more details, see the announcement blog 2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations.
Picture of the TAIT 50th Anniversary Logo

Here are more related blogs:

Here are Page Numbers for the 468p Prepublication Version of the Final UST Regulations

Are you reviewing the 2015 Revised UST Regs to find out what applies to you?

I have been, and there is a lot to read! I found it extremely helpful to add page numbers to my table of contents for quick reference when going through the 468 page document, called the Prepublication version of the final UST regulations. I’m sharing those numbers with you, too! This should make finding what you are looking for even easier 🙂 Although the formatting doesn’t copy properly, it’s in the same order and I’ll put the page numbers (in parenthesis) and bold them so they stand out for you.
Picture of Melanie's 2015 UST Regulations Binder

We like to help you understand the UST regulations. TAIT stays abreast of current and upcoming regulations and performs tank work around the country. From fueling system design and installation, ongoing compliance inspections and testing, repairs and upgrades, to tank replacements, removals and closures, TAIT can assist you with your tank projects. In the business over 50 years, we are experts and can your nationwide tank compliance program or perform one inspection for you. Plan for the future – these regs are coming (we do have time, from immediate, to one year, up to three years for some changes) Reach out to me and tell me what you’re considering, I’ll be happy to discuss your options with you. Melanie Nelson mnelson@tait.com 214-531-9377

Prepublication Version of the Final UST Regulations Table of Contents

I. General Information (6)

Does this Action Apply to Me? (6)

II. Authority (6)

III. Background (7)

A. Changes to the UST Regulations (7)

B. History of the UST Laws and Regulations (12)

C. Potential Impact of this Regulation (13)

D. EPA’s Process in Deciding Which Changes to Incorporate in the Regulations (15)

E. Implementation Timeframe (17)

IV. Revisions to the Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tank Systems (19)

A. Establishing Federal Requirements for Operator Training and Secondary Containment (20)

1. Operator Training (20)

2. Secondary Containment (30)

B. Additional Requirements for Operation and Maintenance (39)

1. Walkthrough Inspections (40)

2. Spill Prevention Equipment Tests (46)

3. Overfill Prevention Equipment Inspections (51)

4. Secondary Containment Tests (55)

5. Release Detection Equipment Tests (62)

C. Addressing Deferrals (68)

1. UST Systems Storing Fuel Solely for Use by Emergency Power Generators – Require Release Detection (69)

2. Airport Hydrant Fuel Distribution Systems and UST Systems with Field-Constructed Tanks (74)

3. Wastewater Treatment Tank Systems that Are Not Part of a Wastewater Treatment Facility Regulated Under Sections 402 or 307(b) of the Clean Water Act (125)

4. USTs Containing Radioactive Material and Emergency Generator UST Systems at Nuclear Power Generation Facilities Regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ( )

D. Other Changes (133)

1. Changes to Overfill Prevention Equipment Requirements (134)

2. Internal Linings that Fail the Periodic Lining Inspection and Cannot Be Repaired (136)

3. Notification (138)

4. Compatibility (142)

5. Improving Repairs (153)

6. Vapor Monitoring and Groundwater Monitoring (157)

7. Interstitial Monitoring Results, Including Interstitial Alarms, Under Subpart E (163)

E. General Updates (168)

1. Incorporate Newer Technologies (168)

2. Updates to Codes of Practice Listed in the UST Regulation (178)

3. Updates to Remove Old Upgrade and Implementation Deadlines (182)

4. Editorial Corrections and Technical Amendments (184)

F. Alternative Options EPA Considered (188)

V. Updates to State Program Approval Requirements (194)

VI. Overview of Estimated Costs and Benefits (211)

VII. Statutory and Executive Orders (212)

A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Overview and Executive Order 13563: Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review (212)

B. Paperwork Reduction Act (212)

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act (214)

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (215)

E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism (217)

F. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (217)

G. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (219)

H. Executive Order 13211: Actions Concerning Regulations that Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use (221)

I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (223)

J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations (223)

K. Congressional Review Act (225)

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

After the EPA’s explanation of considerations and decisions about the changes (p. 5-225), the regulations follow. As I note those changes, I will add them here.

 

New UST Regs for Protection from Groundwater Contamination

EPA’s updated underground storage tanks (UST) regulations are final and will be published soon in the Federal Register

The U.S. EPA has strengthened the Underground Storage Tank (UST) requirements to protect us from groundwater contamination with better prevention and detection of leaks from UST systems. The UST program changes, revisions to the 1988 federal underground storage tank (UST) regulations, strengthen UST prevention and detection practices, increase emphasis on properly operating and maintaining UST equipment, and ensure parity in implementing the national UST program. This is the first major revision to the federal UST regulations since 1988.

Check out the Comparison Chart overview of the 468 page document– it points out major changes to the 1988 UST regulations with the new 2015 UST regulations. You can see the actual differences in a redline strikeout version showing the final 2015 regulations imbedded into the existing regulations. I’ve found both of these documents very helpful. The 10-page chart is a great quick review and the strikeout is a good resource.

EPA created a specific website for the Revised UST Regulations so you can access links to a pre-publication version of the signed regulations, regulatory impact analysis, and response to comments document as well as the comparison and additional resources. Once published, a link to the Federal Register version of the regulations will also be listed there.

I really liked that Carolyn Hoskinson, the head of EPA’s UST program shared

At all times we based our decisions on these strong values:

  • balance important environmental protection with the reasonableness of the cost and complexity to our regulated community
  • focus on the highest priority areas that appear to continue to lead to ongoing releases from UST systems
  • allow flexibility whenever possible
  • rely on industry standards whenever possible
  • consider the implementation of these requirements and strive to make the requirements as straightforward as possible by things like aligning due dates and writing in plain, easy-to-understand language

While these changes may be difficult and expensive for people/companies, I understand that the underlying purpose is to protect us from groundwater contamination and appreciate the values Carolyn pointed out they operated under as they considered their revisions. The EPA granted a 3 year grace period for many of the significant changes. If you have any questions about your UST compliance, please ask. We’re here to help.

Melanie

View from one of TAIT's projects in Alaska

View from one of TAIT’s projects in Alaska

2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations

2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations

We’ve been waiting for years for the update to finally be announced, and here it is: The requirements implemented on the effective date of the final UST regulation are those that either do not require significant education and outreach or apply to new installations, repairs, or releases. EPA is allowing up to three years for owners and operators to implement the requirements that require significant outreach, equipment to be upgraded or installed (such as for previously deferred UST systems), or scheduling and testing. During those three years, the regulatory/implementing agencies shall educate owners and operators about today’s new requirements and allow owners and operators to schedule testing. The exception to implementing the requirements immediately or in three years is that EPA is implementing the secondary containment requirement 180 days after the effective date of the UST regulation.

Keep in mind, we do not have the effective date, yet. We do know it will be soon, maybe tomorrow!

Here are the Implementation Time Frames for the New Requirements in an easy to read chart – Immediately, 180 days or Three Years

Chart of Implementation Time Frames for New Requirements

9 Note that EPA is requiring owners and operators to also submit a one-time notification of existence for these UST systems within 3 years of the effective date of today’s final UST regulation.

States with Approved UST Programs are going to have to incorporate the changes to the UST technical regulations.  They will have three years to reapply in order to retain their SPA status. Owners and operators in these states must continue to follow their state requirements until the state changes its requirements or until the state’s SPA status changes.
Map showing states with EPA State Program Approval

That means there will be three years grace period before we start seeing enforcement/NOVs for some of the required changes.

The owners and operators in 16 non-SPA states and territories must meet the federal requirements according to the schedule in the 2015 UST regulation. In addition, owners and operators will need to follow their state requirements. Indian country UST owners and operators must meet the federal requirements according to the schedule in the 2015 UST regulation.

Here is a Comparison that shows the 2015 Revised UST Regulations versus the 1988 UST Regulations. It’s a 10 page PDF Spreadsheet showing the highlights of the full 468 page document, called the Prepublication version of the final UST regulations. Some forms you may want to review are the New Ownership Change Notification Form and the Updated Notification Form. TAIT recommends all Owners and Operators download and read the updated MUSTs for USTs which provides a nice straightforward explanation of requirements when owning and working with underground storage tanks.

TAIT is an expert in and has been working with fueling systems and Underground Storage Tanks for over 50 years. Our Regulatory Affairs Manager Brian Harmon focuses on the regulatory environment and upcoming changes and his comments are integral to regulation changes such as this. ASK US your questions. Allow us to bid on your tank projects. Before making any quick decisions, let’s discuss your situation and your tanks and we can provide guidance on the most cost effective way to move forward to get you in compliance with the current and new regulations.

Visit the EPA’s Underground Storage Tanks 2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations page for all the details

In June 2015, EPA issued the 2015 underground storage tank regulation and the 2015 state program approval regulation. The revisions strengthen the 1988 federal underground storage tank (UST) regulations by increasing emphasis on properly operating and maintaining UST equipment. The revisions will help prevent and detect UST releases, which are a leading source of groundwater contamination. The revisions will also help ensure all USTs in the United States, including those in Indian country, meet the same minimum standards. This is the first major revision to the federal UST regulations since 1988.

TAIT Continues Growing – Welcome 2013’s 4th Quarter’s New Associates!

TAIT is Growing!

We are looking for more great people, so please contact us if you are interested in joining our team of associates. Learn more about TAIT and our Values, which drive everything we do.

Please join us in welcoming these new hires from 4th Quarter 2013:

TAIT - Rising to the Challenge, Logo Image

11/20/2013 – Please welcome our newest associate, Amir Movahedi, who started working today with the Engineering Dept. in Santa Ana.  Amir is at extension 681 and his e-mail address is amovahedi@tait.com.

11/18/2013 – We have a new associate, Catie Goldstein, who started working in the Engineering Department in our Santa Ana office. She is at ext. 680 or you can email her directly at cgoldstein@tait.com.

We have a new associate who started working for TAIT in Santa Ana 11/04/2013.  Stephanie Buller is the new Executive Assistant; she is at x698 and her e-mail is sbuller@tait.com.

TAIT’s Boise office keeps on growing! On 11/01/2013 Welcome Dan Zimmerman at dzimmerman@tait.com 🙂

As of 10/14/2013, Nicole Nardi is a new, full-time, Environmental Scientist working out of our Santa Ana office. Nicole has a B.S. degree in Health Science – Health Promotion/Disease Prevention; Environmental Health and Safety from Cal State Fullerton.  Nicole started with TES in July 2013 as one of four interns on the [large grocery chain] hazardous waste project and has performed exceptionally well.  She also recently led the charge out in the field on our “dumpster dive” program for [them] and continues to support our professional environmental group.  You may have already seen and met her in our Anaheim office as well. Reach out to welcome her at nnardi@tait.com.

Please welcome them on LinkedIn or send them an email directly. Tait & Associates’ Bismarck office is searching for a Senior Transportation Engineer. For inquiries about employment opportunities at TAIT, you may search our Current Openings or email Nancy.

Previous Blogs welcoming our New Associates:

3rd Quarter New Hires: Engineering Departments Growing in CA and CO

2nd Quarter New Hires: TAIT Multiplies Growth in 2nd Quarter 2013

1st Quarter New Hires: TAIT is Growing – Meet our New Associates

Randy Syphus is now a Professional Architect in the State of Idaho

Please join me in congratulating RANDY SYPHUS on his recent licensure as a Professional Architect in the State of Idaho!  This has been a very challenging process, especially given his many leadership, family, and church commitments outside of work.  We’re very excited for Randy…and we’re anxious to see his ink on some Idaho projects in the near future! Join Randy on LinkedIn.

Congratulations once again, Randy!

Meet Architect Randy Syphus

Randy Syphus, licensed as a Professional Architect in Idaho

Randy Syphus is a Project Manager that has been with Tait 10 years this September. Tait has a reputation for long-term employees, and employees feeling and acting like family. Here is a little history about Randy and his attachment to the Tait team:

Randy graduated from the University of Idaho in 1995 with a degree in architecture. He then went to work as an intern for an architecture firm in Pocatello, Idaho. Randy worked for two firms there before accepting a position at the Albertsons corporate office in 1999 in Boise. Randy moved to the City of Boise and was a PM for Albertsons, hiring architects for many projects. During his tenure with Albertsons, Randy got to know Doug Gibson, a peer to his supervisor. Doug moved on from Albertsons, and was instrumental to getting the Boise office up and running for Tait. When the opportunity came in 2002, Doug snatched Randy up and he’s been with Tait ever since.

Architects must be licensed before they can practice as an architect or call themselves an architect. There are three main steps in becoming an architect: education, internship, and examination.

No single examination can test for competency in all aspects of architecture, which is why the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) is not the only requirement to become a licensed architect. The ARE concentrates on those services that most affect the public health, safety, and welfare. The ARE has been developed with specific concern for its fidelity to the practice of architecture… – NCARB ARE Overview

The testing procedure to become a licensed architect has changed over time – the time that Randy was testing. It used to be 9 tests and has since been reduced to 7, consolidating the content of those tests – meaning Randy had to Re-Test on material he had already taken and passed. Now we really know he knows his stuff!

Randy is a member of the American Institute of Architects, AIA which automatically lends credibility to the firm he works for. Randy is also NCARB Certified, the National Council of Architecture Registration Board. That’s the testing and certification arm of the architectural association, and it means a licensed architect can seek reciprocity in other states without passing other tests, they vouch for you as an individual to practice architecture and support that. There is great value to having the NCARB Certificate. Randy will be stamping and certifying drawings in Idaho and will be seeking reciprocity in a few other states.

When asked for an example project he enjoyed at Tait, Randy replied, “The project that is the most unique from what we typically do (commercial big box grocery stores) is the expansion of the WinCo Headquarters in Boise. They are a family owned grocery chain that started out years ago under a differnt banner, and have rapidly expanded over the last few years. WinCo quickly gained market share and needed to double the size of their headquarters. It was exciting and challenging because it was different. There were a lot more concerns about the working environment for corporate employees, and we quickly adapted to that.”

What does Randy like about architecture? “I am a left-brainer and I really enjoy the details. I enjoy making sure that the graphic representation is buildable. That what we put on a piece of paper, tells the contractor exactly what to do to build correctly – take a 2D picture and build a 3D object out of it. I don’t do the drafting, I am quality control and if I need to sketch details, I do that. I do a lot of red lining, making corrections to drawings so that the drawings are a high quality when they leave the office.

The drawings are our product, and I am the last one to look at it before it goes out on the street – to the permitting agency, the contractor or whatever. Now my stamp and certification will be on there. “The buck stops here.”

Wax philosophical: “The three cornerstones of architecture are… we are creating an environment that includes Firmness (structural soundness) Commodity (fits the function of people that use that space – whether home, business, hotel, whatever) the 3rd one – the more esoteric one that people may think is silly – is Delight (it is aesthetically pleasing, makes you feel comfortable). If you walk into a room that is 8′ wide, 10′ long, 15′ high, it’s like a cave, and people are uncomfortable. But if the room is 15′ wide, 20′ long and 7′ tall, then it is even worse, and makes people feel like they are being pushed down. So, in architecture, we deal with not only the structural concerns for the safety and welfare of the occupants, but also with making the space a pleasing and comfortable space. Our designs should not only fit the function, they should also feel secure – structurally sound – and they should give the person a reason to enjoy that space. Some may misjudge the practice of architecture, or the design of architects as just an expensive way to “make a statement” or to “add fluff” and thereby justifying additional or exorbitant cost.  In fact, there is much about architectural design that is affective, and which almost subconsciously impacts our senses.  These are the less “measureable” aspects of architectural design that bring value.

Why should a potential client consider hiring Tait for their design project?  Simply, Tait offers such a broad range of professional services, and can point to certifications and recommendations from nationally recognized professional organizations to add prestige and clout to any project.  The professionals and support staff at Tait can offer a full range of design services to any client.      

Here’s your chance to get to know Randy Outside of Work: I am married, have 5 children, 5 grandchildren a sixth on the way. I was a young grandpa, and I have truly enjoyed it. I don’t feel like a grandpa, but I am. I’m one of 8 children, and my wife is one of 7 so we are used to big families. We both grew up in Idaho. I have a degree in Spanish translation from Brigham Young University and degree in Architecture from the University of Idaho. I Served in the ARMY for four years. I was in the Intellegence Corps and served as a Spanish Voice Interceptor. My wife and I both speak spanish. I was a missionary for LDS Church for 2 years in Honduras and Belize. My wife was also a missionary for the LDS Church in Peru. We both grew up in Idaho, and even went to the same high school but we never dated back then.

I like to read. I don’t really read novels; I like to read essays, news and political articles, as well as religious and philosophical writings. Also, I like to read about architecture and keep up on that. I exercise and am pretty active and I go to the gym every day. I usually run 3x a week, bike, or do some stairs the other two days. I am not training, I just like to keep in shape, keep active. I am also very active in my church, and usually have weekly obligations related to that.