Tag Archives: California

CA Criteria for Tanks in Subsurface or Below Grade Structures

Effective January 1, 2013, AB 1566 makes changes to the UST regulatory program in California, specifically regarding the criteria for regulating tanks located in subsurface or below grade structures.

“Aboveground storage tank” or “storage tank” means a tank that has the capacity to store 55 gallons or more of petroleum and that is substantially or totally above the surface of the ground, except that, for purposes of this chapter, “aboveground storage tank” or “storage tank” includes a tank in an underground area.

“Underground storage tank” means any one or combination of tanks, including pipes connected thereto, that is used for the storage of hazardous substances and that is substantially or totally beneath the surface of the ground.

Discussions regarding vaulted tanks and tanks in basements have been going on the last few years, with discrepancies between tank owners and the State Water Resources Control Board regarding whether an AST located in an underground area, such as a basement, cellar or pit, should be considered a UST, and when that should happen.

Assembly Bill No. 1566 is “An act to amend Sections 25270.2, 25270.4, 25270.12, 25281, and 25281.6 of, and to add Sections 25270.4.1, 25270.12.1, and 25270.12.5 to, the Health and Safety Code, relating to aboveground storage tanks.”

This Flow Chart is a straightforward way to define whether a tank will be classified as a UST or an AST.

Flow Chart of AB 1566 UST Provisions

For more information, and to read the bill, go to the Official California Legislative Information website.

 

Commodities Studies in California

Tait Environmental Services has experience in the preparation of Hazardous Materials Commodities Flow Studies (Commodities Study) to meet the needs of individual CUPAs to respond to and minimize the impacts from a release or threatened release of hazardous materials in their jurisdictions.

The November 15, 2012 late application deadline is quickly approaching to apply for grants to pay for a Commodities Study in your City/County.  Grants can be obtained through the California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness (HMEP) program.  More information can be found at the CalEMA website at http://www.calema.ca.gov/. Email Paul McCarter now to discuss preparing your Commodities Study, or you can call him at 714-560-8612.

The Commodities Study is part of the overall HMEP Project Cycle that also includes Area Plans, Table Top Exercises, and Hazardous Materials Response Team Needs Assessment.

The purpose of a Commodities Study is to examine where, when, how much, and by what means chemicals are transported throughout a given county, region or jurisdiction.   The commodity study helps to analyze traffic patterns, better match planning programs to existing needs within communities, and reduce the potential for releasing incidents of hazardous materials to occur.

A Commodities Study becomes an important tool for emergency responders to increase awareness, mitigation, and response to hazardous materials emergencies within their respective regions.  A commodity study can also be used by local planning officials to demonstrate the risk mitigation potential and commodities involved in specific areas of the jurisdiction.

Commodities Studies are authorized under California Code of Regulation, Title 19, Division 2, Section 2720-2728.  Kern County’s Hazardous Materials Commodities Study  is an example of one that Tait created.

Are you going to the CUPA Conference? February 4-7, 2013, Tait will be on site to meet with the agencies, businesses and communities we serve.  Save the date and come see us at the conference! Contact us and we will schedule meeting time with you in advance.

Join Tait at the 2013 CUPA Conference

Join Tait at the 2013 CUPA Conference this February

 

Has Your State Waived Stage II Vapor Recovery Requirements?

Has Your State Waived Stage II Vapor Recovery Requirements? Because recent models of most vehicles include vapor recovery technology in the cars and trucks themselves, EPA is allowing states that can demonstrate widespread fleet turnover to remove from their State Implementation Plans Stage II vapor recovery requirements for gasoline-dispensing facilities once state regulations are repealed.

A little history: Stage II vapor recovery is one of the tools states could use in order to attain and maintain air quality standards required by Part C or Title I of the Clean Air Act of 1990. The Stage II Vapor Recovery system was required to be installed in non-attainment areas that did not meet the state and federal air quality standards.

In vehicles that do not have an ORVR system, a Stage II Vapor Recovery system installed on the fuel dispensers is an important thing for anyone who pumps gas to consider. Before awareness was brought to the dangers of these toxic vapors escaping into the atmosphere, there were no measures taken to contain the vapors and dispose of them in an environmentally friendly way. Eventually, a method was developed that let the vapors flow back into the gasoline pump as the gas pumped into a vehicle. This development signified great progress but soon became unnecessary as cars become more technologically advanced and were able to treat these vapors themselves.

In 1994, automobile manufacturers were required ito install an ORVR system for the vehicles sold in the United States. ORVR Implementation was broken down into four phases starting with Light Duty Vehicles (LDVs) and ending in 2004 Heavier-Light Duty Trucks (LDTs).

Now, we are looking at regulation changes: As of May 16, 2012 the EPA waived the requirement for states to implement Stage II Vapor recovery systems at gasoline dispensing facilities. For a state-with the EPA’s approval-to revoke this regulation they must request to remove the program from their State Implementation Plan (SIP). The reason for this change is that the majority of cars that were built after 1996 have the means to safely control the vapor so it does not escape into the environment. Many of these states require pre-established gas pumps to keep the old technology but allow new or renovated gas pumps to forgo this extra amenity.

Due to the changing regulations, there is a need to constantly be aware of what each of the states, and in some instances local agencies, are requiring. The list below has been compiled to show the status of each state, and we have linked to the state websites and actual documentation where possible so you may review data from the source:

Alabama       Updated 9/13/12

Alabama has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules.

Alaska     Updated 9/13/12

We do not have information at this time.

Arizona     Updated 9/13/12

Arizona has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. The Stage II vapor recovery program is implemented by the Arizona Department of Weights and Measures.

California     Updated 9/14/12

California has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. The California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) still requires the operation of stage II vapor recovery systems throughout the state.  They are expected to keep this regulation until 2020-2030.

Colorado     Updated 10/23/12

Colorado has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Stage II vapor recovery is not required in Colorado, but systems are used in certain isolated locations in this state.

Connecticut – YES     Updated 7/23/13

Connecticut has waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules for newly constructed GDF as of 2/12/2012. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) has found that the Stage II vapor recovery program is quickly becoming obsolete and soon will no longer provide air quality benefits. Governor Dannel Malloy signed a bill into law June 18, 2013, that allows gasoline dispensing facilities (GDFs) in the state to decommission Stage II vapor recovery systems provided the procedures outlined in PEI’s Recommended Practices for Installation and Testing of Vapor Recovery Systems at Vehicle-Fueling Sites (PEI/RP300-09) are followed. All GDFs must remove Stage II equipment on or before July 1, 2015.

DC     Updated 9/14/12

DC has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. When the EPA’s vapor recovery program was required, DC was subject to these regulations because they were a part of the Ozone Transport Region (OTR). DC adopted these regulations in November of 1992 and although the EPA has found that Stage II vapor recovery’s effectiveness is decreasing, DC still requires the systems to be maintained.

Delaware     Updated 9/13/12

Delaware has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Any gasoline dispensing facility that ever exceeds a throughput of greater than 10,000 gallons of gasoline will be subject to all the requirements of the Delaware regulation. This regulation requires a gasoline dispensing facility to maintain a Stage II vapor recovery system.

Florida     Updated 9/13/12

Florida has waived Stage II Installation requirements in their local rules. They do not require Stage II installation on facilities installed after 5/15/2007 in Palm beach county, Broward county, and Miami-Dade county.

Georgia     Updated 9/13/12

Georgia has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Currently Georgia’s Stage II gasoline vapor recovery rule prohibits any person from constructing or reconstructing a gasoline dispensing facility unless the “facility is equipped and operating with a vapor recovery system to recover the displacement vapors from the vehicle’s gasoline storage tank.” Rule 391-3-1-.02(2)(zz)(1). There are different requirements in the separate counties of Georgia. Knowledge on your area’s gasoline dispensing facility is key to understanding Georgia’s requirement. Current Georgia regulations can be found here.

Hawaii     Updated 10/23/12

Hawaii does not require Stage II vapor recovery controls.

Idaho     Updated 10/23/12

Idaho currently does not require Stage II vapor recovery controls.

Illinois     Updated 9/18/12

Illinois has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Any new station in Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties, Oswego Township in Kendall County and Goose Lake and Aux Sable Townships in Grundy County with average sales of 10,000 gallons of gasoline per month or an existing station thats sales exceed 10,000 gallons of gasoline average per month must install and operate a Stage II vapor recovery system.

Indiana     Updated 9/13/12

Indiana has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. This state however, has passed a non-rule policy that Stage II vapor recovery requirements do not apply to used exclusively for dispensing E85 blended fuel.

Kansas     Updated 10/23/12

Stage II vapor recovery controls are not required in Kansas.

Kentucky     Updated 9/13/12

Kentucky has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Stage II controls are still required at gasoline dispensing facilities in Kentucky. 401 KAR 59:174 holds the official requirements for these facilities.

Louisiana     Updated 9/14/12

Louisiana has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Stage II vapor recovery controls are required in the parishes of Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Iberville, Livingston, Pointe Coupee and West Baton Rouge. On March 3, 2008, LAC 33:111.2132.B.5’s ban on the dispensing of motor vehicle fuel without a “Stage II recovery system certified by CARB on or before March 31,2001” does not apply to segregated E85 dispensing systems which can only dispense E85 to vehicles.

Maine     Updated 9/13/12

Maine has waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. As of November 5, 2008, Maine counties York, Cumberland, and Sagadahoc were required to operate a Stage II vapor recovery system if any gasoline dispensing facilities exceeded 1,000,000 gallons of output per year. In 2008, Maine law also enacted to repeal the recovery requirement for all gasoline facilities by January 1, 2012. (38 MRSA Section 585-E) They also exempted any facilities from this regulation if the facility exceeded the minimum threshold annual throughput or was constructed after June 30, 2008. As of April 3, 2011 Maine’s air rules require the removal of the Stage II system by January 1, 2012 as decreed by Chapter 118 in the rules.

Maryland     Updated 9/13/12

Maryland has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. They even require tests to be performed on the vapor recovery system ranging from every twelve months to every five years.

Massachusetts – YES     Updated 7/23/13

In 2009 the MassDEP amended 310 CMR 7.24 to exempt refueling facilities that dispense E85from Stage II requirements. On April 27, 2012, an amendment was proposed to 310 CMR 7.24(9) that facilities which refuel corporate and commercial fleets exclusively should be exempt from the Stage II requirements.

The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection has decided to exercise its enforcement discretion to allow all motor vehicle GDFs to decommission their Stage II vapor recovery systems. Beginning July 1, 2013, facilities may decommission their Stage II systems, provided that the facility meets the conditions set forth in its June 21, 2013, enforcement discretion directive. The directive requires, among other things, that the GDFs decommission their Stage II systems according to PEI’s 2009 edition of PEI/RP300.
Michigan     Updated 9/18/12

Michigan has waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. As of April 2011, the state requirements and the new federal rule do not require Stage II vapor balance systems.

Minnesota     Updated 10/23/12

Minnesota does not require Stage II vapor recovery; there are no designated ozone nonattainment areas in the state.

Mississippi     Updated 10/23/12

There are no ozone nonattainment areas in Mississippi that require Stage II vapor recovery.

Missouri     Updated 9/13/12

Missouri has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Stage II vapor recovery is required by Missouri Regulation 10 CSR 10-5.220.

Montana     Updated 10/23/12

Montana does not require Stage II vapor recovery because there are no designated nonattainment areas within the state.

Nebraska     Updated 10/23/12

Nebraska currently has no nonattainment areas and does not require Stage II vapor recovery.

Nevada     Updated 10/23/12

Stage II vapor recovery currently is required in Las Vegas and Reno counties.

New Hampshire     Updated 9/13/12

New Hampshire has waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Rule 1404.17 exempts stations installed after 1/1/2012 and allows existing to remove Stage II by 12/22/2015.

New Jersey     Updated 9/18/12

New Jersey has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. A gasoline station may only be in operation if it is equipped with a vapor control system.

New Mexico     Updated 10/23/12

Donna Anna county is the only ozone nonattainment area that requires Stage II controls in New Mexico.

New York     Updated 9/13/12

New York has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is responsible for regulating gasoline vapor releases at gasoline dispensing sites and from gasoline transport vehicles. The counties of Suffolk, Nassau, Rockland, Westchester, and lower Orange, and New York City are required to maintain Stage II vapor recovery systems according to 6NYCRR Part 230. The owner or operator of each dispensing site is responsible for maintaining the equipment. Recently, the state of New York has found that the emission benefits of Stage II no longer justify the the cost of installing new systems or maintaining existing ones.  The DEC is currently working to repeal Stage II requirements.

North Carolina     Updated 9/13/12

North Carolina has waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Title 15A, chapter 2 Subchapter 2D, section 900, rule 953 & 954 were repealed in 2009. These rules required a stage II VR to be installed. 2.0953 specifically applies to facilities located in Mecklenburg County. It states that any facility built after June 30, 1994 or if a new tank is added after that date it must comply with the regulations for vapor return piping for stage II vapor recovery. 2.0954 regulates the control of gasoline vapors at the vehicle fill-pipe during refueling operations. These rules were repealed on April 19, 2009.

North Dakota     Updated 10/23/12

There are no ozone non-attainment areas in North Dakota; the state does not require Stage II vapor recovery.

Ohio     Updated 9/13/12

Ohio has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. However, the Ohio EPA is working to waive the Stage II requirements.

Oklahoma     Updated 9/13/12

Oklahoma has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules.

Oregon     Updated 9/13/12

Oregon has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Though the state only requires these vapor recovery programs in the Portland metropolitan area (Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties).

Pennsylvania     Updated 9/13/12

Pennsylvania has waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. New law (Act-135), signed on July 5, 2012, requires review of compliance strategy. The Pennsylvania DEQ will not enforce Stage II VR requirements on new installations with the Stage II VR Regs due to increased throughput.

Rhode Island     Updated 9/14/12

Rhode Island has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Currently, Stage II vapor recovery controls are required for all gas stations that were constructed or substantially modified after Nov. 15, 1992. Gas stations built before that date that have or have had a monthly throughput of more than 10,000 gallons in any one month after Nov. 1991 also must comply.

South Carolina     Updated 10/23/12

South Carolina currently does not require Stage II vapor recovery controls.

South Dakota     Updated 10/23/12

South Dakota does not currently require Stage II vapor recovery controls.

Tennessee     Updated 9/13/12

Tennessee has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Gasoline dispensing facilities in Davidson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson, and Wilson Counties are required to maintain vapor recovery requirements if they sell more than 10,000 gallons of gasoline in any one month. Independent small business marketers of gasoline are only required to install Stage II vapor recovery controls if they sell 50,000 or more gallons of gasoline in any month. A Tennessee rule-1200-3-18-.24-(4)-requires for these systems to be tested for vapor tightness ever five years.

Texas     Updated 3/20/14

3/20/2014: The EPA approved the Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP) to decommission Stage II Vapor Recovery. The final rule is available at http://www.regulations.gov  Docket # EPA-R06-OAR-2013-0439. The effective date for this rule is 4/16/14.

1/21/2014: Texas published that the rules for Stage II Vapor Recovery equipment removal
have been written
, and are waiting on EPA approval. Removal may not begin until a minimum of 30 days after approval is received. The TCEQ approved the proposal to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to waive the requirement to implement Stage II in five counties near the Dallas – Fort Worth area; Ellis, Johnson, Parker, and Rockwall on April 11, 2012. On May 16, 2012 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) withdrew their proposed revision to the Stage II Vapor Recovery Program. Texas’ current Vapor Recovery Program does contain exemptions. For example, a facility that has never dispensed gasoline from stationary storage tanks is exempt from following the Stage II Vapor Recovery requirements.

Utah     Updated 10/23/12

Stage II vapor recovery controls are not required in Utah.

Vermont     Updated 9/13/12

Vermont has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. A law passed by Vermont Legislature (10 V.S.A. §583) in 2009 decreed that gasoline stations in Vermont will no longer be required to operate and maintain Stage II vapor controls by January 1, 2013. In many cases, Stage II will not need to be installed before January 1, 2013.

Virginia     Updated 9/13/12

Virginia has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. No proposals to waive the requirements have been seen. The only activity from Virginia legislature on the vapor recovery was in January of 1993 when Stage II was first implemented.

Washington     Updated 9/14/12

Washington has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Starting January 24, 1998, Stage II vapor recovery programs were mandatory in various counties of Washington state. These programs were required if the annual throughput exceeded 1.2 million gallons in Cowlitz and Thurston counties. In Kitsap county, if the annual throughput is greater than 840,000 gallons and in Clark, King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties if the throughput is more than 600,000 gallons, a Stage II system must be installed by December 31, 1998. Gasoline dispensing facilities in all counties must abide by the regulation if their throughput is over 1.5 million gallons and is close to a resident.

West Virginia     Updated 10/23/12

Stage II controls are currently not required in West Virginia.

Wisconsin     Updated 9/14/12

Wisconsin has not waived Stage II Installation requirements in local rules. Specifically, vapor recovery is required in Kenosha, Kewaunee, Manitowoc, Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Sheboygan, Washington, and Waukesha counties. The owner or operator of the gasoline dispensing facility is responsible for making sure the vapor recovery equipment is is working properly. There are exemptions available from this program for facilities that never dispense more than 10,000 non-retail, or 50,000 retail, gallons of gasoline per month.

Wyoming     Updated 10/23/12

Wyoming currently does not require Stage II vapor recovery controls.

Guam     Updated 9/13/12

We do not have information at this time.

Puerto Rico     Updated 9/13/12

We do not have information at this time.

Virgin Islands     Updated 9/13/12

We do not have information at this time.

Tait Offers California Area Plans

Tait Environmental Services has extensive experience in the preparation of Hazardous Materials Area Plans (Area Plans) to meet the needs of individual CUPAs to respond to and minimize the impacts from a release or threatened release of hazardous materials  in their jurisdictions.

The November 15, 2012 late application deadline is quickly approaching to apply for grants to pay for an Area Plan in your City/County. Learn about the State of California’s Area Plan for HazMat Emergencies Program. Tait has more experience than just about anyone in California on this. Email Paul McCarter now to discuss preparing your Area Plan, or you can call him at 714-560-8612.

Area Plans consist of emergency response procedures, pre-emergency planning, notification and coordination, training, public safety and information, supplies and equipment, critique and follow up, and more. Area Plans utilize information from other related plans which deal with hazardous materials emergency response at the federal, state, regional, and local levels. They will integrate business plan information, HazMat incident response procedures manuals, public notification procedures and much, much more. A great deal of effort is expended in preparing a plan specific to your local area – both collecting new data about the Hazardous Materials being transported through your area – and pouring over existing procedures and collected data, to create an Area Plan that will allow you to implement it in the event of hazardous materials incident in your jurisdiction. The Area Plan will identify local, state, and federal responsibilities during incidents involving the release or threatened release of hazardous substances.

Area Plans are authorized under California Code of Regulation, Title 19, Division 2, Section 2720-2728.  Read the California Code of Regulations about Area Plans, and let us know if you have any questions. Kern County’s Area Plan is an example of one that Tait created.

Area Plans must be revised and updated on a continuous 3-year cycle. When was the last time your Area Plan was reviewed? Call us today and let’s start the process!

Here is a recommendation letter for Tait’s Area Plans:

Click here to get a list of Area Plan consultants from the CalEMA website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you going to the CUPA Conference? February 4-7, 2013, Tait will be on site to meet with the agencies, businesses and communities we serve.  Save the date and come see us at the conference! Contact us and we will schedule meeting time with you in advance.

Join Tait at the 2013 CUPA Conference

Join Tait at the 2013 CUPA Conference this February

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TAIT UST Inspections and Testing Across the US

Inspection Locations Across the Southern United States

Inspection Locations Across the Southern United States

TAIT Environmental Services is expanding throughout the United States in an effort to help clients address the new Class A/B UST operator training and inspection regulations promulgated by the 2005 Energy Policy Act.  To address the Energy Policy Act, each state has developed their own regulations for UST operator training and in some cases, inspections.  TAIT understands the regulations in each state and is acutely aware of their impact on UST owners.

For many clients, TAIT has assumed the role of the “Class B UST Operator” and is performing routine inspections and “Class C Operator” training at UST sites throughout the United States.  TAIT has performed more than 40,000 UST operator inspections in the past 6 years on behalf of our clients.

TAIT has developed a web-based system for performing inspections on a Microsoft SharePoint 2010 platform called TAIT Environmental Compliance System (TECS) Online.  TECS allows for complete web-based management of inspections,  forms, documents, and records.

Contact Scott Brehmer for more information about our inspection services and TECS Online.

Upcoming Changes to the California UST ICC Exams

The California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) announces changes to ICC UST Service Technician, Designated UST System Operator, and UST Inspector exams.

SWRCB recently announced pending changes to UST certification exams for the State of California.  The ICC exam content and references have been amended for the California UST Service Technician (UT), the California Designated UST Operator (UC), and the California UST Inspector (UI) exams.  This marks the most significant changes to the exam content and references since the regulations went into effect on January 1st, 2005.  The updates take effect on July 1st, 2012.

The most significant changes to the exam reference materials are that Straight Talk on Tanks will no longer be used, and the Petroleum Equipment Institute (PEI) Recommended Practices (RP) 500 and PEI RP900 are now included as references for all three exams. PEI is the leading authority for fuel and fluid handling equipment. Tait is a long term member of the Petroleum Equipment Institute.

The UC and UI exams remain open book. However, starting July 1st, 2012 those taking the UC and UI must bring both the PEI RP500 and PEI RP900 to their exam. The UT exam remains closed book. Don’t worry, we are keeping a close eye on all the changes and are updating our California Training to keep it the most current course/s available. Tait is in constant communication with the State Water Resources Board, so please ask us if you have any questions for them and we will be happy to respond if we are already familiar with the question, or find out for you.

Paul McCarter now certified as a Florida Professional Geologist

Please join us in congratulating Paul McCarter in obtaining his certification as a Florida Professional Geologist. The achievement did not come easy. It took about eight months to navigate the maze of paperwork required to process the certification through reciprocity. Those of us who know Paul and have worked with him since he joined TAIT in 2005 as a Senior Project Manager/Senior Geologist do not wonder at the successful conclusion of his efforts. His combination of talent and drive is evident in all that he does.

In Paul’s 6 1/2 years at TAIT, he has served in many roles, including managing large dollar assessment and remediation projects and supervising compliance staff at critical times during the implementation of UST Designated Operator inspections in California. Some of the most complex projects included a major remediation project at an oil transfer station, a major asbestos and lead-based paint assessment and remediation project at a former military base, and numerous third-party professional environmental reviews of sites overseen by other consultants.

One favorite story of Paul’s was when he was contacted by a prospective client several years ago to review the groundwater and soil contamination related to a former underground storage tank at the client’s property.  After a careful review, Paul informed the client that the (now former) consultant had given him erroneous information concerning reimbursement from the State Cleanup Fund, and Paul recommended that he reapply to the fund under his correct priority/status level.  The client did so, and ultimately received about $1,000,000 back from the Fund.  Long story short the client now uses Tait as its consultant on that property.

It's not a Glamour Shot, but it's Paul

He may be as serious as he looks. Maybe...

Paul was born and raised in Niagara Falls, Ontario in Canada, and completed his B.Sc. degree in Geology at the University of Western Ontario in 1974, followed by the completion of his M.S. degree in Geology at Oregon State University in 1980. He has worked in the Mining Exploration Industry in northeastern and northwestern Canada and the western United States until 1990, when he began working in the Environmental Industry. His expertise includes minerals exploration and property development, Phase I and Phase II Environmental Assessments and third-party environmental document review. Paul is now based in the TAIT Santa Ana office, located at 701 N. Parkcenter Dr., Santa Ana, CA 92705.

Paul resides in southern CA, with his wife Karolyn and daughter Sarah. In addition to these family members, Paul’s oldest child  Layla, is a 6-time world title-holding professional boxer. Boxing fans can check her out at http://www.laylamccarter.com or at http://www.womenboxing.com. Outside of work, his interests are varied and include hiking, golfing, following politics, sports and writing drop-dead-funny song parodies, usually about sports teams on the losing end of one of his favorites.

This newest certification is added to an impressive list of his credentials including Professional Geologist in the states of California, Wyoming  and Arizona ; California Certified Hydrogeologist and California Registered Environmental Assessor II .

TAIT is now capable of providing in-house geology services in Florida, California, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, and Colorado. Our ability to provide these services in Florida marries well with our existing tank services in the state. Please let us know if you are aware of any opportunities that would allow us to utilize this new registration.  

Thank you for your patience and perseverance Paul! We can’t wait to hear what’s next.

Teamwork was #1 as Tait Designed and Built new Fueling System for JB Hunt

Truck Fueling at new JB Hunt facility Tait built

When JB Hunt Transportation acquired adjacent property to their existing Stockton CA facility, Tait Environmental Services was selected to remove the old fueling operation from the newly acquired property and design and build a Fueling Facility.

The previous fueling facility Tait removed was an old single wall Owens Corning 10K gallon AST and mechanical dispenser. The new installation consisted of a new double wall UL142 15K gallon Modem Welding AST. Two new Wayne high flow master satellite dispensers, UDCs, and EJ Ward Fuel Management systems were put into place. The new 10 horsepower off load pump station offers quick fuel deliveries into the AST, and the new tank monitor oversees the system.

This project started in November 2010, when JB Hunt was acquiring the property adjacent to their existing facility. Ron Weaver at JB Hunt talked to Andy Tait and that’s how it all started.

Dennis Tweedy tells the story: It turned out so nice! Our teams did a great job. We removed the old system in place, I designed a new system for them, we bounced back and forth on the design so everyone was happy, submitted to county, got it all permitted and built it. It’s a state of the art facility, a flagship operation for them. I’m used to building Gas Stations with Shell or Valero logos, but we were in control of the design and painting and the whole 9 yards. BJ Ward is their fuel management system, we tied that right into their network. As soon as we had the network up and running, we plugged in the tank monitor and JB Hunt was able to dial in within 5 minutes to see their tank monitor and fuel levels. It went without a hitch.

I was really proud of that project. We did it all in house, brought some people up from Southern California, most of the guys in Northern CA worked on it. There are 2 Dresser Wayne high flow dispenser, with sattellites, so they have two full lanes for fueling for their diesel operation. We put an air and water system out there that’s hooked to their shop air. It’s a clean facility.

As far as permitting goes, the County of Stockton CA worked with me preliminarily. They were a huge help in helping me design it. They were really looking forward to that old system going away and were excited about what JB Hunt was doing, as well. They were spectacular; I can’t say enough nice things about them. Inspectors actually took time to look in the books at what I could do, were there at all the inspections, were excited about the project, and you don’t get that very often.

The offload pump we installed, you’ll see the diesel that is filling up at the AST. We installed a 10hp offload pump, and they can fill up a 15k tank of diesel in about 5 minutes. The delivery driver, had a chance to talk to her, she was elated, saying “it saves me so much time on my deliveries, saves me so much time it’s ridiculous.”

James Livoni, the company electrician, did a fantastic job installing a completely new fuel subpanel. We had a subcontractor, Carr Electric (in Stockton, have worked with them on diff projects throughout the years) install a whole new feed for our subpanel, which had to go from the existing prime power at the facility, had to do a horizontal bore all the way to the building to get our own separate power feed for that. Everyone worked well together, it just clicked. Everyone helped out, I can’t think of one problem or one argument we had with agencies or anyone. Everyone just pitched in and helped get it done.

Teamwork is defined in Webster’s New World Dictionary as “a joint action by a group of people, in which each person subordinates his or her individual interests and opinions to the unity and efficiency of the group.” Throughout Dennis’s account of the project, Teamwork is preeminent, which is why this is such a great story to share.

Ron Weaver at JB Hunt said, “The project went well. I was pleased with the attention Dennis gave it and the quality of the product we ended up with. The timing and scheduling and permitting efforts he put into all that were great. I’m about 2,000 miles away and have to rely on people like him. I really appreciate having Dennis there.”

Here are the BEFORE photos

 

TAIT Instrumental in Construction of Riverbank Marina Fuel Dock

For the first time in two decades, a new fuel dock has opened on the Sacramento River giving boaters an additional location to fuel up their boats. The new Chevron Fuel Dock, offers both gas and diesel is located at Riverbank Marina and open to all boaters.

TAIT Environmental Services was instrumental in obtaining the 25 permits required to construct the state-of-the-art, self-pumping fuel system.  “Every marina application is different,” said Dennis Tweedy, Project Manager with Tait Environmental Services.
“We employed a best practices approach and installed extra safety measures to ensure not only regulations were met, but that the system exceeds the baseline requirements for above-ground fuel installation.”

If you have questions for Dennis about how and his team completed such an important project, give him a call (916-436-6021) or send him and email at DTweedy@TAIT.com.  He would love to share his knowledge!

California Air Resources Board (CARB) Public Hearing

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) is considering amendments to vapor recovery certification and test procedures for underground and aboveground storage tanks including gasoline dispensing facility hose regulation.  CARB has sheduled a public hearing for September 22, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. Pacific time.  Here are the public hearing details:

September 22, 2011, 9:00 am
California Environmental Protection Agency
 Air Resources Board
Byron Sher Auditorium, Second Floor
1001 I Street
Sacramento, California 95814 

Certification by CARB is required in most other states that require vapor recovery at service stations.  Consequently, these amendments can have a national impact.  If you have any questions about the proposed amendments, contact Brian Harmon at TAIT by sending him an email at BHarmon@TAIT.com