Tag Archives: Underground Storage Tanks

PEI Response to RP900 Public Comments

PEI is the leading authority for fuel and fluid handling equipment.

PEI’s Underground Storage Tank (UST) System Inspection and Maintenance Committee met earlier this month and acted on 98 public comments offered to update PEI’s Recommended Practices for the Inspection and Maintenance of UST Systems (PEI/RP900)

Many of the comments were accepted in one form or another. A few suggestions that were not incorporated into RP900 are also of some significance to users of the document.

Here is a summary:

  • The scope of the recommended practice was NOT expanded to include UST systems and associated equipment other than that used to store and dispense gasoline, diesel and related petroleum products at vehicle fueling facilities. In other words, the document is not intended to apply to marinas, aviation-fueling facilities, farms, emergency generators, etc. The committee did broaden the scope to include the shear valve.
  • The Committee recognized that, in many instances, the new federal inspection requirements that became effective October 13, 2015, were less comprehensive than the inspection practices contained in the 2008 edition of RP900. After reviewing all the inspection requirements of the federal rule, the Committee revised the document to meet or exceed the walkthrough inspection requirements and frequencies contained in the federal regulations. In a few instances, the Committee included recommended procedures for walkthrough inspections in the document that were not included in the federal rule. The Committee also rejected several proposals to increase the frequency of some inspections (e.g., spill bucket drain valves, interstitial space of drain valves).
  • A number of comments dealt with water and the quality of fuel in the UST. The Committee made a few tweaks to Section 7.6.5.1 that now requires the owner to check to see if water is present and, if found, to notify the appropriate person in the company. Section 7.6.5.1 also will direct the owner to a new appendix that will discuss water issues and suggest strategies to keep water out of the tank. The appendix will be available for public review and comment before it is included in the 2016 edition of RP900.
  • All of the testing requirements contained in RP900 were removed from the document and will be considered for inclusion in PEI’s Recommended Practices for the Testing and Verification of Spill, Overfill, Leak Detection and Secondary Containment Equipment at UST Facilities (PEI/RP1200). By this action, the Committee opted to provide one document to use for walkthrough inspections of UST systems (RP900) and another to test the equipment and verify it is working properly (RP1200). As a result of this decision, both RP900 and RP1200 will be released simultaneously, probably sometime this summer.

UST Secondary Containment and Interstitial Monitoring Requirements

Are you responsible for ensuring site or corporate environmental compliance or for implementing a site environmental management system that includes fueling systems? Whether you’re an environmental manager, a plant engineer, plant/general manager, facility manager, site manager or other role, if you’re involved with underground fuel storage tanks, the new rules regarding secondary containment should be of interest.

Federal UST Secondary Containment and Interstitial Monitoring Requirements

The 1988 requirement and criteria required secondary containment and interstitial monitoring for hazardous substance tanks only (280.42). The EPA is implementing secondary containment with interstitial monitoring and under-dispenser containment (UDC) as additional measures to protect groundwater. States that have already implemented secondary containment regulations that meet or exceed the federal regulations will not have to change their requirements. There are significant changes to the federal requirements and implementation which are summarized below. The implementation timeframe for secondary containment is 180 days. States with approved programs still have three years to reapply, and depending on which state you are in, you may still be governed by the state program rather than the EPA regulations.

Owners and operators are required to install tank and piping secondary containment that will contain regulated substances leaked from the primary containment until they are detected and removed and that will prevent the release of regulated substances to the environment at any time during the operational life of the UST system, and must be  monitored for leaks at least once every 30 days using interstitial monitoring.

NEW INSTALLS and REPLACING Tanks and Piping

Owners and operators are now required to install secondary containment and interstitial monitoring for ALL (including petroleum) new and replaced tanks and piping. There are still some exceptions like safe suction piping and piping associated with field-constructed tanks over 50k gallons, and airport hydrant systems.

REPAIRING Piping

Owners and operators must replace the entire piping run when 50% or more of the piping (excluding connectors) is removed and other piping is installed.

NEW DISPENSERS

All new dispensers need to have under-dispenser containment.

Interstitial Monitoring

Interstitial Monitoring of new and replaced secondarily contained tanks and piping must occur at least once every 30 days as a release detection requirement.

The EPA reviewed data from release sites and the higher number of releases from single walled tanks and piping when compared to secondarily contained systems was considered in the decision for new requirements to prevent regulated substances from reaching the environment and ensure a consistent level of environmental protection for regulated USTs across the USA.

 

Comparing EPA’s 2015 Revised UST Regulations Documents

Where do you start?

Want to know where to start when reviewing the 2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations Documents? I’ve been pouring through the documents shared on EPA’s website created just for the revisions of the UST regulations and here are some quick descriptions that I hope you’ll find helpful.

Comparison Chart of the 2015 Revised UST Regulations versus the 1988 UST Regulations This is a 10 page PDF Spreadsheet showing the highlights of the changes

Prepublication version of the final UST regulations This is the full 468 page document that explains the rationale behind the changes that were made to the regulations and includes the new regulations. The first half is an explanation that helps the reader to understand what the EPA considered, such as suggestions from commenters, during the discussion and decision making and the rationale for the decisions that were made. Here are the page numbers to go with the Table of Contents. That should help you navigate this big document 🙂

Red Line Strikeout of 40 CFR part 280 and 40 CFR part 281 This is 141 pages but is very helpful if you are used to looking up information in the regs already. This shows the differences between the regulations we are currently using/looking at, and the changes that have been made to the regulations.

MUSTs for USTs If you are new to owning or operating underground storage tanks, start here. TAIT recommends all Owners and Operators download and read the updated MUSTs for USTs. It’s an instruction manual that provides a nice straightforward explanation of requirements when owning and working with underground storage tanks. It’s 40 pages.

Regulatory impact analysis 167 pages, Potential costs, benefits and other impacts of the updated regs. They’re referred to in the Prepublication Version of the Regs as well. This may be good for giving an explanation of what we might expect to see overall, like the number of facilities affected.

Response to comments document 181 pages, if you commented on the regs and want to see the responses given, this is where you would look. Comments are also referred to in the Prepublication version of the final regs.

I hope this serves as a nice reference for you, and this should make finding what you are looking for even easier 🙂 For a more details, see the announcement blog 2015 Revised Underground Storage Tank Regulations.
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